Useful Resources

World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work For Poor People: e-Discussion

During a 7-week period from April 14, 2003 through May 30, 2003, the World Bank and Public World will co-host a moderated electronic discussion on the forthcoming WDR 2004: "Making Services Work for Poor People". The e-discussion is an opportunity for a wide range of stakeholders from government, business, and civil society to exchange views about the content and main ideas of the draft report.

Further details: /newsletter/id/29727
World Health Assembly Documentation

To access a range of World Health Assembly documents, speeches and resolutions, click on the link below.

World Health Assembly, 2001

The World Health Assembly met in Geneva from 14 to 22 May. The Assembly charts the global course for the WHO and its 191 Member States in dealing with major public health threats. This year's event featured an address by the UN Secretary-General, Mr. Kofi Annan.

World Health Chart

The World Health Chart is developed in collaboration between WHO and Swedish institutions. The aim is to visualize world health development and thereby enable better use of international health data for learning, advocacy and hypothesis generation. A first beta-version called WHC 2001 Public Beta 0.1 is now free to download for testing. Please comment to whc@ki.se It can be used by: Teachers and students of health, economics and demography; Professionals and policy makers in the health sector; Staff of international organisations; Researchers and journalists. It can be used to: Learn and teach about health development in the world; Illustrate projects, presentations, articles and campaigns; Advocacy and policy analysis; Generate ideas and hypotheses for research; Assessment of international health data.

World Health Organisation (WHO) Guideline Recommendations on digital interventions for health system strengthening
World Health Organisation: WHO, Geneva, 2019

Digital health, or the use of digital technologies for health, has become a salient field of practice for employing routine and innovative forms of information and communications technology (ICT) to address health needs. The World Health Assembly Resolution on Digital Health unanimously approved by WHO Member States in May 2018 demonstrated a collective recognition of the value of digital technologies to contribute to advancing universal health coverage (UHC) and other health aims of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This guideline presents recommendations on emerging digital health interventions that are contributing to health system improvements, based on an assessment of the benefits, harms, acceptability, feasibility, resource use and equity considerations. This guideline urges readers to recognize that digital health interventions are not a substitute for functioning health systems, and that there are significant limitations to what digital health is able to address. It presents a subset of prioritized digital health interventions accessible via mobile devices, and will gradually include a broader set of emerging digital health interventions in subsequent versions. It includes the following topics: birth notification via mobile devices; death notification via mobile devices; stock notification and commodity management via mobile devices; client1-to-provider telemedicine; provider-to-provider telemedicine; targeted client communication via mobile devices; digital tracking of patients’/clients’ health status and services via mobile devices; health worker decision support via mobile devices; provision of training and educational content to health workers via mobile devices (mobile learning-mLearning).

World Health Report 2005 Online

The World Health Report 2005 – Make Every Mother and Child Count, says that this year almost 11 million children under five years of age will die from causes that are largely preventable. Among them are 4 million babies who will not survive the first month of life. Read the report by clicking on the URL provided.

World Health Statistics 2011
World Health Organisation: August 2011

The World Health Statistics report is an essential resource for policy-makers and researchers working on the identification and reduction of health inequities. A dedicated section in the 2011 report presents data from 93 countries using three health indicators - percentage of births attended by skilled health personnel, measles immunisation coverage among 1-year-olds, and under-five mortality rate - disaggregated according to urban or rural residence, household wealth and maternal education level. The data presented refer to ratios and differences between the most-advantaged and least-advantaged groups.

World Health Statistics 2011
World Health Organisation: August 2011

The World Health Statistics report is an essential resource for policy-makers and researchers working on the identification and reduction of health inequities. A dedicated section in the 2011 report presents data from 93 countries using three health indicators - percentage of births attended by skilled health personnel, measles immunisation coverage among 1-year-olds, and under-five mortality rate - disaggregated according to urban or rural residence, household wealth and maternal education level. The data presented refer to ratios and differences between the most-advantaged and least-advantaged groups.

World Health Statistics 2018: Monitoring health for the SDGs
World Health Organisation, Geneva, 2018

The World Health Statistics series is WHO’s annual snapshot of the state of the world’s health. This 2018 edition contains the latest available data for 36 health-related Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators. It also links to the three SDG-aligned strategic priorities of the WHO’s 13th General Programme of Work: achieving universal health coverage, addressing health emergencies and promoting healthier populations. The latest data available shows that less than half the people in the world today get all of the health services they need. In 2010, almost 100 million people were pushed into extreme poverty because they had to pay for health services out of their own pockets. 13 million people die every year before the age of 70 from cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes and cancer – most in low and middle-income countries.

World Malaria Report 2005

The World Malaria Report 2005 is the first comprehensive effort by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership to take stock of where the world stands in relation to one of its most devastating diseases. It reveals that the tide may be beginning to turn against malaria as control and prevention programmes start to take effect.

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